©2019 by Martin Roberts Foundation.

 

Why Sadsville is Needed

Children are less happy today

In their latest ‘Good Childhood Report’, The Children’s Society found that young people became happier with their lives in the 15 years from 1995 to 2010...but then things got worse again and now children's well-being is as low as it was 20 years ago. Their findings include:

• Pressure to fit in with society's expectations is making children 

unhappy 
• Alarming numbers of children are self-harming 
• Non stop comments about appearance are harmful to girl's well-being 
• Outdated gender stereotypes are damaging to boys' and girls' happiness 
• Family relationships are particularly important for girls 
• Social media and online apps are adding extra pressure.

The number of children with mental health issues is increasing 

In November 2018, NHS Digital published the results of its survey of the Mental Health of Children and Young People in 2017. In its findings: 

More children of a younger age are turning to Childline 

In 2016/17, children aged 11 and under accounted 26,369 of counselling sessions offered by Childline. This is up from 25,142 in 2015/16 and 22,194 in 2014/15, which was an increase of 3% from the previous year 2013/14. 

Childline want to reach out to children under 11 and Sadsville is a perfect tool for this. Introducing the topic of sadness in its wider sense through the medium of a storybook.

Peter Wanless, CEO NSPCC

“The Sadsville book project will help support the work of the NSPCC to protect children today and prevent abuse from  happening tomorrow... SADSVILLE introduces children to problem solving and explains that you 

can be sad for a number of different reasons and encourages them to have  the confidence to seek help. 

 

The number and website for the Childline support services offers a call to action at the end of the book and provides children with a lifeline when needed the most. In the most extreme of cases, this lifeline saves lives. By 

distributing SADSVILLE widely, we put this message in to the hands of children who may not otherwise have known who to turn to for help, and although it is impossible to monitor how children come to hear about Childline, the number of additional children using the service as a direct result of this initiative could be highly significant."

In 2016/17, children aged 11 and under accounted 26,369 of counselling sessions offered by Childline. This is up from 25,142 in 2015/16 and 22,194 in 2014/15, which was an increase of 3% from the previous year 2013/14. 

Childline want to reach out to children under 11 and Sadsville is a perfect tool for this. Introducing the topic of sadness in its wider sense through the medium of a storybook.

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